Greater Johnstown Senior High School

Skip to main content
Dual Enrollment » Pennsylvania Highlands Community College

Pennsylvania Highlands Community College

Greater Johnstown School District

Accelerated College Education (ACE)

Course Descriptions

Courses with Co requisite(s):

BIO 104 - Principles of Biology I Lecture

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of the cell, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis, meiosis, genetics and evolution. Lectures emphasize human biology and are complemented by discussions that stress critical thinking. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
Co requisite(s): BIO 114
3 credits

BIO 114 - Principles of Biology I Lab

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of the cell, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis, meiosis, genetics and evolution. Lab experiments are designed to teach basic scientific skills, and to reinforce the topics covered during BIO 104 lectures. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
Co requisite(s): BIO 104
1 credit

CUL 155 - Foods I

This course provides the students with an introductory level of food principals, food preparation, and commercial kitchen equipment use. Foods 1 is a foundational course for achieving the Associates of Science in Hospitality Management. The basic cooking skills and kitchen knowledge are a prerequisite to advancing forward in all Culinary Arts programs. In addition, this course is designed to provide the student with an in depth understanding of sanitation issues, including food borne illnesses, and safety concerns and systems of the commercial kitchen.
Co requisite(s): CUL 110 Introduction to Hospitality
4 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)

PHY 101 - Physics Laboratory

This course illustrates the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments. Experiments in laboratory are conducted on force, work, acceleration, energy, waves, reflection and refraction.
Co requisite(s): PHY100 Physics
1 credit

Courses with Pre-requisite(s):

ACC 220 - Automated Accounting

This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of how computerized accounting systems function. Students work with up-to-date commercial accounting software commonly used in small to mid-sized business. Includes six fully integrated accounting modules: General Ledger, Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, Payroll, Inventory, and Projects.
Pre-requisite(s): ACC110 Principles of Accounting, CIT100 Microcomputer Applications
3 credits

CHM 106 - Introductory Chemistry

This course is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts of chemistry and connections of these chemical principles to everyday life. Topics include atomic structure, the periodic table, stoichiometry, properties of gasses, chemical bonding, acids and bases, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement the lecture material, and to introduce common equipment and techniques in the field of chemistry.
Pre-requisite(s): MAT131 Intermediate Algebra, MAT 117 Technical Math for Trades, or high school algebra
4 credits

CHM 120 - General Chemistry I

This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in chemistry and science. The lecture portion of the course focuses on the study of the properties of matter and chemical transformations. Topics include: measurement, chemical nomenclature, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, atomic theory, molecular structure, thermochemistry, and gas laws. The laboratory will reinforce the lecture topics and emphasize safety technique. This course is a first semester course of a two semester sequence.
Pre-requisite(s): High School Chemistry and Algebra (or placement test into College Algebra)
4 credits


CHM 122 - General Chemistry II

This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in chemistry and science. This course is a continuation of the study of the basic principles of chemistry. Topics include: intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. The laboratory will reinforce the lecture topics and emphasize safety and technique. This course is a second semester course of a two semester sequence.
Pre-requisite(s): CHM120 General Chemistry I
4 credits CIT 107 - Microsoft Word

This course provides basic as well as advanced information and hands-on training in the use of Microsoft Word for Windows. Students create, edit, format, revise and print documents. Students also learn to add graphics to documents and work with multiple documents as well as sorting and merging techniques.
Pre-requisite(s): CIT100 Microcomputer Applications
3 credits

CUL 161 - Foods II

This course is designed to provide the students with an opportunity to continue practicing learned skills in both culinary production and customer service in the operating restaurant. A study of the fundamental principles of food preparation and cookery, including the Brigade System, cooking techniques, material handling, heat transfer, sanitation, safety, nutrition, and professionalism in the kitchen will be studied, as well as a continued development of customer service techniques and habits in the dining room. In addition, student will develop skills in basic mathematical operations and study of their applications in the food service industry. Topics include percentages, weights and measures, ratio and proportion, weights and measures conversions, determination of portion costs for menu items and complete menus, portion control, and the increase and decrease of standard recipes.
Pre-requisite(s): CUL155, MAT 110, and ServSafe Certification
2 credits (1 lecture, 1 lab)

ENG 110 - English Composition I

This course emphasizes the techniques of writing expository essays with stress upon careful thinking, word choice, sentence structure, thesis statement, and methods of organization. Students practice the writing of clear, coherent, and unified paragraphs and essays. Editing skills and the use of correct grammar and mechanics are also emphasized. Students are taught research and documentation skills and are required to write an argumentative research paper. This is the standard college English composition course.
Pre-requisite(s): ENG020 Introduction to Composition or by placement exam
3 credits

ENG 200 - English Composition II/Studies in Literature**

Studies in Literature emphasizes the study of literary terms and techniques frequently used in literature. This course introduces students to major themes found in short stories, poetry, and drama. Students are required to read various genres of literature, respond to their readings in well- developed essays, and participate in class discussions. This is a standard college-level introductory literature course.
Pre-requisite(s): ENG110 English Composition I
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
3 credits

FRE 102 - French II

This course is a continuation of FRE 101 with increased emphasis on reading and conversational skills.
Pre-requisite(s): FRE 101 French I or by placement
3 credits

MAT 145 - College Algebra

Students enrolled in this course should have a strong background in basic and intermediate algebra. Topics include a more in-depth study of expressions, solving equations, solving inequalities, circles, and a detailed study of functions including polynomial, logarithmic, and exponential functions.
Pre-requisite(s): MAT131 Intermediate Algebra or by placement exam
3 credits

MAT 210 - Calculus I

This course is designed as the first calculus course for students pursuing degrees in mathematics, engineering, or the natural sciences. Students are introduced to the basic concepts of calculus including limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives, and integration. Logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions are included.
Pre-requisite(s): MAT 170 Pre-Calculus or by placement exam
4 credits

PHY 100 - Physics

This course introduces students to phenomena, concepts and principles of physics. Concepts are taught in context of how they relate to four energy systems: mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal. The course is for students who may not have prior physics instruction.
Pre-requisite(s): MAT115 Construction Math, MAT117 Technical Math for Trades, or MAT131 Intermediate Algebra
3 credits

SPA 102 - Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPA101 with increased emphasis on reading and conversational skills.
Pre-requisite(s): SPA101 Spanish I or by placement
3 credits

SPA 203 - Spanish III

Spanish III combines the review of Spanish grammar with intensive practice in reading, writing, speaking and listening. The student will develop cultural sensitivity through contact with authentic materials such as videos and readings by famous Hispanic writers and personalities. The student will respond by speaking, reading, writing and understanding on a level commensurate with his emerging proficiency level. He/she is expected to improve his/her skills weekly so as to complete the course with an advanced-mid designation in accordance with established ACTFL guidelines.
Pre-requisite(s): SPA102 Spanish II or by placement
3 credits



WEL 102 - Welding II

Instructor demonstrations and practice by the students involving Vertical and Overhead welding techniques to include Tungsten-Arc Inert Gas (TIG) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Students will also go over basic welding techniques using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW).
Pre-requisite(s): WEL101 Welding I
3 credits

Courses with Co-requisite(s) & Pre-requisite(s):


BIO 106 - Principles of Biology II Lecture

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of animals and plants, including organ systems, reproduction and the regulation of body systems. The course also provides an overview of the Earth’s ecosystems and the diversity of life within each ecosystem. Lectures are complemented by discussions that stress critical thinking. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I
Co-requisite(s): BIO 116 Principles of Biology II Lab
3 credits

BIO 116 - Principles of Biology II Lab

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic principles of biology including the structure and function of animals and plants, including organ systems, reproduction and the regulation of body systems. The course also provides an overview of the Earth’s ecosystems and the diversity of life within each ecosystem. Lab experiments are designed to teach basic scientific skills, and to reinforce the topics covered during lectures. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in biology.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I
Corequisite(s): BIO 106 Principles of Biology II Lecture
1 credit

BIO 202 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course introduces the student to the structure and function of the human body. This is a semester long introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology and prepares the student for Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Course topics will include the organization of the body at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels and homeostatic mechanisms associated with the endocrine, integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 or accepted by CSON or high school biology within the last five years
Corequisite(s): BIO 212
3 credits


BIO 212 - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I

This course introduces the student to the structure and function of the human body. This is a semester long introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab applications. Students will experience and apply the material learned in lecture through experimentation and application of the scientific method to the following topic areas. Course topics will include the organization of the body at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, focusing on the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 104 Principles of Biology I; or accepted by CSON; or high school biology within the last five years
Corequisite(s): BIO 202
1 credit

PHY 120 - Physics (Calculus-based) I

An introduction to mechanics. Among the topics covered are the kinematics and dynamics of linear motion, the conditions for static equilibrium, the principles of conservation of energy and of momentum, Newton’s law of gravitation, the kinematics and dynamics of rotational motion, mechanics of solids and fluids and thermodynamics. Differential and integral calculus and simple vector analysis are used throughout. This course is recommended for students planning to transfer to four year institutions as engineering, physical science, premed, and computer science majors.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 210 Calculus I
Corequisite(s): PHY 121 Physics (Calculus-based) I Laboratory
3 credits

PHY 121 - Physics (Calculus-based) I Laboratory

The course illustrates many of the topics introduced in lecture through hands-on laboratory experiments. Experiments in laboratory are conducted, but not limited to, the topics of force, acceleration, gravity, friction, circular motion, matter, and temperature.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 210 Calculus I
Corequisite(s): PHY 120 Physics (Calculus-based) I
1 credit





Courses with NO Co requisite(s) or Pre requisite(s):

ACC 100 - Introduction to Accounting

This is an introductory course in financial accounting - the language of business. This course takes the student through the basics: what accounting information is, what it means, and how it is used. By aiming on the function, not the formation of accounting information, this course will serve those students who will pursue advanced studies in accounting as well as those students who will embark upon other academic paths. This course presumes no prior knowledge of accounting.
3 credits

ACC 110 - Principles of Accounting

This course is designed to supplement Introduction to Accounting (ACC 100) by presenting procedures used throughout the entire accounting cycle, from the point of original entry through the preparation of financial statements. Emphasis is placed on developing a firm foundation of fundamental procedures that will serve as basic preparation for students who elect to challenge advanced accounting courses and as an accounting requisite for students to pursue other majors.
3 credits

ART 110 - Introduction to Painting and Sculpting**

This hands-on course introduces the student to various materials and techniques used to create works of art. The course involves 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional projects.
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
3 credits

BUS 110 - Introduction to Business

This course examines the social, legal, ethical, economic, and political interactions of business and society. This is a foundation for students who specialize in some aspect of business and also provides the opportunity for non-business majors to learn about the impact of business in a society in which they are citizens, consumers, and producers. Topics include economic systems; government and business; ethics and law; social responsibility; globalization; and international business concepts, principles and practices.
3 credits


BUS 125 - Management Principles

This course presents the principles, techniques, and concepts needed for managerial analysis and decision making. It highlights the functions of planning, organizing, influencing, and controlling behavior in the organization. Principles of organization development are introduced.
3 credits

CIT 100 - Microcomputer Applications

This hands-on course introduces the student to the more popular microcomputer software packages available including Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations. This course provides students with a working knowledge of these software packages to accomplish the more common tasks. The Microsoft Office suite, MS Word, MS Excel and MS PowerPoint is used.
3 credits

CIT 165 - Hardware Components

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and ability to identify various types of computer hardware. The student will become familiar with internal and external hardware and their configurations.
3 credits


CIV 100 – Western Civilization: Ancient-Renaissance

This course examines past cultures in order to compare their experiences and make us aware of the opportunities and limitations of modern cultures. Major political, social, economic, and culture trends and their influences on modern civilization are examined. As an introduction, this course begins in the Ancient Near East and proceeds through the Central Middle Ages. Western Civilization II (CIV110) examines the period from the 17th century to the present.
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.

3 credits



ECE 110 - Child Development

This course focuses on child development from conception to age nine with an emphasis on the infant/preschool child through middle childhood. The course studies the physical, cognitive, and personality-social aspects of development, both through normal and atypical circumstances. Small group projects, child observations, investigation, and discussion of issues related to scientific principles of development are examined. Students will explore children’s software and use the Internet to locate information relevant to the further study of child development and developmentally appropriate practice. The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards, the Pennsylvania Early Learning standards (ELS), and the Council for Exceptional Children standards (CEC) are used throughout the course. Students should obtain the following clearances while taking this course: Acts 34, 114, & 151.
3 credits


ECE 140 - Early Childhood Environments

This course explores methods for planning, facilitating, and assessing developmentally appropriate activities and environments designed to enhance typical and atypical children’s cognitive, social, emotional, physical, and creative development in different program models. The course includes developing an awareness of and appreciation for diversity and use of anti-bias in materials. Students also will learn to apply the Pennsylvania Early Learning Standards (ELS) and the Pennsylvania Special Education Early Learning Standards (SELS) PA PreK-4th grade teacher competencies to the creation of developmentally supportive environments. Students are introduced to lesson, unit, and thematic planning, teaching strategies and curriculum development. Students complete observations and small group activities in Stars 3 or 4 centers, or public schools. Students should obtain the following clearances while taking this course: Acts 34, 114, & 151.
3 credits


ECE 225 - Health, Safety and Nutrition for the Young Child

This course is intended for pre-service students, new and experienced early education teachers, parents, and colleagues in any role that touches children’s lives. Three major topical areas are addressed: children’s health, safety, and nutrition (basic and applied). The course focuses on the relationships that exist between health status, safety, nutrition, and social and environmental factors. Students will explore influences of poverty, inequality of medical care, and access to good nutrition. Participants will explore methods for managing children’s health, safety and nutrition and approaches through which young children can become informed about their own health and begin to take responsibility for their well-being. Participants also will be encouraged to work to improve social conditions affecting children’s health and welfare.
3 credits

FRE 101 - French I

French I studies the foundation of French grammar, with exercises in speaking, and an introduction to French culture and history through selected readings. This course is open to students with no previous training.
3 credits


GOV 100 - Introduction to American National Government**

This course introduces the institutions and processes of American national government. The course examines the evolution of the principles, form, and operation of the national government system with special emphasis on constitutional issues; voting behavior; public opinion; the party system; the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial branches of American national government.
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
3 credits

HIS 100 - U.S. History I: Discovery through Reconstruction**

This course focuses on the history of the United States from European discovery and settlement to Reconstruction. Major events will be introduced and analyzed along with political, economic, social and cultural challenges that America faced during that period.
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
3 credits

HIS 110 - U.S. History II: Reconstruction to Present**

This course focuses on the history of the United States from the Gilded Age to our status as a sole superpower today. Major events will be introduced and analyzed along with political, economic, social and cultural challenges that America faced during that period.
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
3 credits

MUS 100 - Introduction to Music

This course is an introduction to music which studies the elements of music (notation, scales, meter, rhythm, intervals) instruments of the orchestra, vocalization, and the lives and works of composers from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary eras. Use is made of recordings, concerts, and other media.
3 credits

PSY 100 - General Psychology**

This course is a general introduction to the scientific study of the brain, behavior, and mental processes of humans and animals, with emphasis on the goals of psychology: to describe, explain, predict, and control behavior. Students examine the substance of psychology such as biopsychology, sensation and perception, learning, memory, cognitive processes, affective behaviors, and mental illness through an examination of the theories, principles, and methods of research used in the field. Examples and applications enable the student to acquire the elements of critical thinking as adapted to the research environment. Students produce an APA formatted research paper. This course applies the fundamental principles of psychology as a natural science. Students explore current research through reading original empirical research and write an APA formatted analytic research paper.
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
3 credits

SOC 100 - Introduction to Sociology**

This course introduces the basic sociology concepts and theories, with emphasis on application of these concepts to the understanding of American institutions: politics, economics, religion, education, marriage and the family.
Note(s): **This course is part of the 30 credit transfer framework agreement with the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education universities.
3 credits

SPA 101 - Spanish I

This course studies the foundations of Spanish grammar with exercises in speaking, and an introduction to Spanish culture and history through selected readings. Open to students with no previous training.
3 credits


WEL 101 - Welding I

Instructor demonstrations and practice by the students in basic Oxyacetylene and Arc welding. The students will practice flame cutting, gas and arc welding in flat, horizontal, and vertical positions. Emphasis on lab techniques and safety to include safe and correct methods of assembly, operation of welding equipment and use of grinders
3 credits

WEL 110 - Welding Metallurgy

This course covers the manufacturing of metals and alloys. Emphasis is placed on the metal’s properties as to weld ability. The student will study and have demonstrations in the use of tensile tester, impact tester, metallographic, metallurgical microscopes, and polishing techniques.
3 credits